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Yoga Etiquette →

getyouryogaon:

In no particular order:

Enter as a whisper - use your inside voice

Take your shoes off - not only is it hygenic, it’s tradition

No talking - If you have a question or need to tell the instructor something, that is understandable and welcomed, but chatting it up with your friends about your day side by side on your mats, not cool. 

Yoga + gum = a major negative

No cell phones - on silent, no vibrations

Late arrivals - if meditation has started, wait outside till it’s completed, enter very quietly, find the closest place that you can lay your mat down and do it as quiet as a little yogic mouse. 

Roll out your mat QUIETLY

Territory -  Don’t ask for someone’s else spot if they are in a place you prefer. If the place is packed and more people are coming in, it’s thoughtful to help make room for them if the teacher hasn’t already. Two fingers distance is all you really need in-between mats so don’t become territorial, open your heart to making room, and it will make that person feel more welcome than you can imagine.

Be clean. Don’t smoke or wear perfume before class, this distracts others.”

Always bring a towel for yourself. wipe yourself off and around your mat before you leave the room, PLEASE. There is nothing worse than stepping in someone else’s body fluid,

Stay within the practice - students going off in another direction or pose from what is being taught as a distraction and confusing to others.

Source: getyouryogaon

Yoga Etiquette: Part Two →

getyouryogaon:

Dippin’ out during Corpse/Savasana:  It’s our time for the absorption of the practice. It’s also the release of the practice, don’t cheat yourself or others of this pose. 

Give the 411 of old and new injuries: I think the student who has practiced more than a few times, should let the instructor know about injuries or any physical limitations prior to class. However, I fully believe that it is the responsibility of the teacher to communicate with students prior to class to help better direct them during class. 

Don’t become a yoga M.I.A: If you are a class regular, let your teacher know if you will be absent, cause we worry.

Your stuff, outta sight, outta mind!: No bags, keys, wallets, shoes, and certainly no cell phones. Even on silent, even if you never touch it, it’s visual clutter that reminds you and everyone else, of obligations and attachments outside the yoga room.

A sharing space is a caring space: Your yoga mat is pretty much all the room you need.  So next time someone arrives late, be brave, give them a welcoming smile, stand up and share some space. I promise like that ripple effect, it will spread and people will make room for you making room.

Saying goodbye is such sweet sorrow: Smile and saying thank you and good bye to your teacher.Most instructors have prepared that class just for you. Sometimes hours of preparation if not days, goes into their art. Teachers of yoga need to hear a little gratitude sometimes.

Source: getyouryogaon

September is to Costa Rica what July is to the United States: a month filled with patriotic displays and celebrations of the country’s Dia de Independencia, which officially takes place on Sept. 15.

 

Costa Rica is a country brimming with national pride thanks in part to the fact that its Independence Day traditions that are highly centered around the younger generations. For the nation’s work force, Sept. 15 might be just one day off work, but for the school children, it marks the culmination of months of preparation and time to show off their artistic talent.

Central America actually declared its independence from Spain collectively from the colonial seat in Guatemala in 1821, meaning Sept. 15 is a day of celebration up and down the isthmus. As with most colonial government affairs, Costa Rica had little to do with the decision, and the region didn’t even learn of its independence until a full month later when a delegation arrived from Guatemala to pass on the news.

Every year, a flaming torch is carried from Guatemala starting on Sept. 11 all the way to the former colonial capital of Costa Rica in Cartago, symbolizing the arrival of the news of independence. The runners are selected from the local schools throughout Central America to carry the torch an average of 500 meters, a task that serves as a great source of pride. The torch crosses the Nicaraguan border into Costa Rica each year on the eve of the day of independence and arrives in the northern town of Liberia in time for a sunset ceremony on Sept. 14. Runners and bikers follow the torch route for varying distances, occasionally getting lost as outlying townspeople join the crowd to light their own torches to carry along their own divergent routes.

As the torch makes its way through Costa Rica, local townships kick off the two days of celebration with parades, mascaradas, concerts and cultural shows. School children are required to participate in their town parades in marching bands or by carrying “Faroles”, or elaborate homemade paper lanterns. Their designs sit atop or hang from a wooden stick with candles inside to light the way. It is a tradition for the children to make their own lanterns in patriotic colors, often in the form of a house, animal, vehicle or other creative representations of national symbols.

I adore Yoga!

Tagged: wordsrealityquoteloveworld

Source: unspeakable-truths

This is why I love bacon…..when it’s alive!

Pull the thread of animal rights…and we find it interdependently tied to social causes, civil rights, meditation and spiritual practice, faith in God, family…everything worth anything. And that sucks, you see: ’cause then we can never eat bacon, no more—in the same way that we can’t kick a puppy or wear shoes made by child labor. We walk a new path, one that’s not about perfection—everything we buy or wear or eat is tied to suffering—but because we want to do our best, and enjoy this short, wonderful life to the utmost.

This is why I love bacon…..when it’s alive!

Pull the thread of animal rights…and we find it interdependently tied to social causes, civil rights, meditation and spiritual practice, faith in God, family…everything worth anything. And that sucks, you see: ’cause then we can never eat bacon, no more—in the same way that we can’t kick a puppy or wear shoes made by child labor. We walk a new path, one that’s not about perfection—everything we buy or wear or eat is tied to suffering—but because we want to do our best, and enjoy this short, wonderful life to the utmost.

Like we did in the old days…..

Missing my team and wishing I was preparing for the first game tomorrow!  Good Luck!